International Visiting Research Scholar public talk

Displaying: 4 event(s)
May11
International Visiting Research Scholar public talk

Opening Doors for Right-wing Populism in the Electoral Arena?: German Voters' New Mobility

Abstract:
Since the 2013 federal election, the spectre of right-wing populism has haunted German electoral politics. Within months after its foundation, the ‘Alternative for Germany (AfD)’ gained so much support in the electorate that it failed entry into the German national parliament by a very small margin. At all second-order elections since then, the party has constantly increased its voter support. Meanwhile it is so strong that the architecture of the German party system is changing profoundly, with unclear perspectives for future electoral politics. In this talk, Dr. Schmitt-Beck will discuss these developments in long-term and short-term perspective. Partisan dealignment, as well as the addition of ‘pre-aligned’ East Germans to the electorate, has led to a considerable increase in German voters’ overall mobility at elections. Against this background, the rise of the AfD can be explained as the joint result of voters’ availability and strategies of party elites.

Speaker:
Dr. Rüdiger Schmitt-Beck is Professor of Political Science - Political Sociology at the University of Mannheim, Germany. He has published widely on electoral behaviour, political communication (with a special emphasis on mass communication, parties’ campaign communication and interpersonal communication in voters’ political discussant networks), and political culture.

Lunch: 11:30am - 12:15pm
Lecture: 12:15pm - 1:45pm

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Date: Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Time: Lunch 11:30 am, Lecture 12:15 - 1:45 pm
Location: Buchanan B Penthouse, 1866 East Mall, Vancouver
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May12
Distinguished Visiting Professor public talk

Law’s Subordination to Numbers: From the Gosplan to the Total Market

Abstract:
From a legal perspective, classical economic liberalism and communism had one essential difference: liberalism recognized that the rule of law was necessary for economic harmony, whereas communism used the law as a tool for implementing a harmony based on quantitative computations. The unholy union of capitalism and communism, which Europe and China celebrated towards the end of the 20th century, accelerated this process of subordinating the Law to Numbers. Classical liberals were aware that the unrestricted pursuit of individual interests would never lead to general prosperity unless the law set limits on individual greed. But neoliberals take the legal fictions, which ground the market, to be facts of nature. They mistake a construct for a given, and extend the paradigm of the market to all areas of human life, including the law, which is considered to be just another product competing on a market of norms.

Speaker:
Alain Supiot was founding Director of the Nantes Institute for Advanced Studies, and professor at the University of Poitiers and Nantes. He was elected to the Collège de France in 2012 as Chair, The Social State and Globalization: a legal analysis of forms of solidarity. He has authored numerous books on labour law and social security, and the analysis of the dogmatic foundations of social ties.

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Date: Thursday, May 12, 2016
Time: 4:00 - 5:00 pm, reception to follow
Location: Allard School of Law, Room 122, 1822 East Mall, Vancouver
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May18
International Visiting Research Scholar public talk

Work in Life: Work and Health in a Life-Course Perspective

Abstract:
Good work is fundamental to life – as is good health. Work and health are interdependent. In view of changing demographics, work and labour markets, and social contexts, the key challenges to be addressed in work and health research and practice are 1) to minimize ill-health and its effects on work functioning, 2) to ensure good physical and psychosocial work environments, and 3) to accomplish these challenges across the widening socio-economic gradient and across the life course. Why a life course lens when looking at work and health? Detailed knowledge about the life transitions people make, e.g., from school to work, changing careers or the transition out of work towards retirement – and the impact of these transitions on trajectories of health, well-being and work functioning – is lacking. To deepen our understanding of the dynamic interplay between work and health, a life-course epidemiological perspective is needed. If we succeed in adopting a life course perspective and translating our findings into relevant policy and practice interventions, researchers, health care professionals, employers and policy makers can make a difference towards “healthy working lives.”

Speaker:
Dr. Ute Bültmann is Professor of Work and Health, in particular from a life course epidemiological perspective, and Program Leader of Public Health Research at the Department of Health Sciences, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, at the University of Groningen, NL. Her research focuses on the epidemiology of work and health, and measurement of health-related functioning at work.

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Date: Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Time: 4:00 - 5:00 pm, reception to follow
Location: Peter Wall Institute, Seminar Room 307, 6331 Crescent Road, Vancouver
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May19
Distinguished Visiting Professor public talk

What does the ILO constitution mean by “un régime de travail réellement humain” (humane conditions of labour)?

Abstract:
The First World War contributed two at first sight contradictory things to the history of labour, but which are actually interdependent: the industrial management of “human material”; and the appeal in the Treaty of Versailles for “un régime du travail réellement humain” (“genuinely human work in humane conditions”). Ernst Jünger’s concept of “total mobilization” influenced conceptions of the Total State (Carl Schmitt) and totalitarianism (Hannah Arendt). Its heuristic value remains powerful, because it exists today in the new form of the Total Market, in which every existence is converted into a quantifiable resource and the inhabitants of every nation of the world are precipitated into an unceasing, and pitiless, economic war. How were these two legacies of the Great War articulated together? Is the pursuit of “humane conditions of labour” compatible with “the scientific organization of work” and the total mobilisation of human capital for a global competitive market? The answer will depend on the interpretation one gives of the notion of “genuinely human work.”

Speaker:
Alain Supiot was founding Director of Nantes Institute for Advanced Studies, and professor at the University of Poitiers and Nantes. He was elected to the Collège de France in 2012 as Chair, The Social State and Globalization: a legal analysis of forms of solidarity. He has authored numerous books on labour law and social security, and the analysis of the dogmatic foundations of social ties.

Click here to register for this free event.

See the poster here.

Date: Thursday, May 19, 2016
Time: 4:00 - 5:00 pm, reception to follow
Location: Peter Wall Institute, Seminar Room 307, 6331 Crescent Road, Vancouver
Link: Read More

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