Podcasts

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Sir Anthony Leggett
Sir Anthony Leggett, June 5, 2014
Explorary Workshop public event

Why can’t time run backwards?

Sir Anthony Leggett
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Sir Anthony Leggett
University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign June 5, 2014
Explorary Workshop public event

Why can’t time run backwards?

About the Author
Tony Leggett is a theoretical physicist who is best known to the public for his work on 'macroscopic quantum phenomena', including the prediction of "Schrodinger's Cat phenomena" in superconductors. This work has re-ignited a debate in science about the paradoxes in quantum mechanics, and the possibility that it may break down at the macroscopic level of tables and chairs. It has also led to an explosion of work on quantum computing, decohernece, and on macroscopic quantum phenomena in everything from superconductors to biological systems. Leggett was awarded the 2003 Nobel prize for physics, for his work on superfluid He-3. He has an unusual background - originally educated in philosophy and ancient history - and his profound analyses of many of the deepest questions in science have had a very large influence. He enjoys traveling and sampling different cultures, and speaks fluently in English, ancient Greek and Latin, Japanese, Russian, & German (at least!).
About the Talk
We can all tell when a movie of some everyday event, such as a kettle boiling or a glass shattering, is running backwards. Similarly, we can remember the past and affect the future, not vice-versa. So there is a very clear "arrow" (direction) of time built into our interpretation of our everyday experience. Yet the fundamental microscopic laws of physics, classical and quantum-mechanical, look exactly the same if the direction of time is reversed. So what is the origin of the "arrow" of time? This is one of the deepest questions in science; I will review some relevant considerations, but do not pretend to give a complete answer. Follow this link to view a video recording and slides from the talk: http://pitp.physics.ubc.ca/quant_lect/2014/Penrose_Leggett.html
Sir Roger Penrose
Sir Roger Penrose, June 5, 2014
Exploratory Workshop public event

Seeing through the Big Bang to another world?

Sir Roger Penrose
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Sir Roger Penrose
Mathematical Institute, Oxford University June 5, 2014
Exploratory Workshop public event

Seeing through the Big Bang to another world?

About the Author
Roger Penrose is, along with Stephen Hawking, perhaps the scientist who is best known to the general public around the world. More than anyone else it is Penrose who is responsible for our understanding of Black Holes and other cosmological singularities like the Big Bang. This theoretical work has revolutionized our understanding of the universe, changing the way we understand everything from cosmology to the evolution of stars and the creation of stellar systems. He has also written a number of best-selling books on the nature of consciousness, minds, and computing, and argued that mental processes like creativity cannot exist unless the brain operates quantum-mechanically. Penrose has always been interested in the visual arts, and he invented both 'Penrose tiling', and the visually paradoxical images usually associated with M.C. Escher; his books and papers are full of his drawings.
About the Talk
One of the great questions of our time is - how did the universe begin? A recent theory, conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC), proposes that what we presently regard as the entire history of our universe is merely one phase (an "aeon") of an infinite succession of similar aeons. The ultimate expansion of each aeon, appears - infinitely scaled down - as the big bang of the next one. Collisions between supermassive black holes in the aeon prior to ours would leave an observable imprint on our cosmic microwave background, apparently already detected by WMAP and Planck space satellites. Sir Penrose discussed recent claims that BICEP2 south-pole telescope observations provide the "smoking gun" for an 'inflationary' beginning to our universe's expansion, arguing that CCC provides an alternative explanation with intriguing consequences. Follow this link to view a video recording and slides from the talk: http://pitp.physics.ubc.ca/quant_lect/2014/Penrose_Leggett.html
Dr. Richard Lester
Dr. Richard Lester, May 7, 2014
International Research Roundtable

mHealth for Infectious Disease Management: Taking Evidence to Scale

Dr. Richard Lester
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Dr. Richard Lester
Infectious Diseases, UBC Faculty of Medicine May 7, 2014
International Research Roundtable

mHealth for Infectious Disease Management: Taking Evidence to Scale

About the Author
Dr. Richard Lester is from UBC's Division of Infectious Diseases and Principal Investigator of the Peter Wall International Research Roundtable, “mHealth for Infectious Disease Management: Taking Evidence to Scale”, discusses how SMS is changing the game with HIV patients in Kenya simply by asking Mambo? [How are you? in Kiswahili]. Dr. Lawrence Mbuagbaw, a Cameroonian Public Health Physician, talks about his experiences as Principal Investigator of the Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS (CAMPS) trial. Lastly, Chief Wayne Christian from Shuswap/Okanagan explains challenges faced by his community, and the pilot project using Weltel mobile phone technology to improve HIV treatment and service utilization among young aboriginal people living with or at risk of HIV in remote settings. To learn more about Weltel, visit: http://www.weltel.org/projects/.
About the Talk
Technologies like the Internet and mobile phones have long promised to revolutionize health care but is that really happening? Can we use technology to build more caring and lasting relationships with patients? Can technology put the patient at the centre of the health care network? This talk was designed to be interactive in order to collectively answer the question: How might we scale our recent successes into Canada and developing economies?
Cynthia Cohen and Jane Wilburn Sapp
Cynthia Cohen and Jane Wilburn Sapp, May 6, 2014
Brandeis University

Arts, Well-being and Resilience: Ideas and Music

Cynthia Cohen and Jane Wilburn Sapp
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Cynthia Cohen and Jane Wilburn Sapp
International Visiting Research Scholar May 6, 2014
Brandeis University

Arts, Well-being and Resilience: Ideas and Music

About the Talk
Dr. Cynthia Cohen reports on her research into resilience, peacebuilding and the arts, focusing particularly on her collaboration with the distinguished musician, activist, educator and cultural worker Jane Wilburn Sapp. The African-American musical tradition — influenced by its West African roots, its evolution through the period of slavery and its development in the Black church — brought the values of non-violence and spirituality to a community’s struggle for justice. Understanding this musical tradition in relation to emerging theories of resilience may point toward strategies that will be effective in addressing the legacies of violence and efforts for social transformation, including those calling for urgent attention in contemporary British Columbia. Dr. Cohen is accompanied by Jane Sapp, who illustrates the power of music’s contributions to resilience through her own stories and through songs performed at the piano. Leaders of local justice-seeking efforts link the presentation to local initiatives and concerns.
Dr. Kenneth Craig
Dr. Kenneth Craig, April 30, 2014
Peter Wall Associate Dinner Forum

Knowing another’s pain

Dr. Kenneth Craig
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Dr. Kenneth Craig
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia April 30, 2014
Peter Wall Associate Dinner Forum

Knowing another’s pain

About the Author
Kenneth Craig, PhD, is Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Editor-in-Chief of Pain Research & Management. His research has focused upon understanding pain experience and expression and related social parameters of pain management, including formative impacts of family and ethnocultural environments, and the challenges of pain assessment in infants, young children and people with intellectual disabilities, brain damage, dementia and developmental disorders. This led him to focus upon nonverbal communication, facial expression in particular, its role in clinical and research measures and the difficulties and biases manifest when health care professionals and others attempt to recognize, understand and control pain. Dr. Craig’s awards have included status as a CIHR Senior Investigator, the Canada Council I. W. Killam Research Fellowship, the Canadian Pain Society Distinguished Career Award, the Canadian Psychological Association Donald O. Hebb Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology as a Science and the American Pain Society Jeffrey Lawson Award for Advocacy in Children’s Pain Relief. He has served as President of the Canadian Pain Society and the Canadian Psychological Association and member of the Governing Council of the International Association for the Study of Pain.
About the Talk
Unacceptable levels of inadequately controlled chronic and acute pain require a deeper societal commitment to understanding pain and to improvement in delivery of health services. Pain emerged in primordial species as a protective biological system that is well-conserved in humans, but evolution of the human brain and the complexities of human society require greater attention to psychological and social determinants of the experience and expression of pain. Research to be described examines the challenges of pain assessment not only in competent children and adults, but also in people with communication limitations or cognitive impairments, including infants and young children, individuals with intellectual disabilities and seniors with dementias. The focus is on the role of nonverbal communication, facial expression in particular, in clinical and research measures of pain and the difficulties and biases manifest when health care professionals and others attempt to recognize, understand and control pain.
Dr. Giancarlo Panaccione
Dr. Giancarlo Panaccione, April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

The (R)evolution of quantum materials

Dr. Giancarlo Panaccione
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Dr. Giancarlo Panaccione
Senior Researcher, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) - Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Trieste, Italy April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

The (R)evolution of quantum materials

About the Author
Dr. Giancarlo Panaccione is Senior Researcher of the Italian National Research Council (CNR), permanent staff at Laboratory TASC of the IOM (Istituto Officina dei Materiali), located in Trieste, in the same campus of the national Synchrotron Radiation source Elettra. After his PhD thesis devoted to surface magnetism at Univ. Paris VI (France), he was in charge of the Swiss experiments at beamline SU3 in LURE (Orsay, France), as a post-doc of the Physics Institute of Neuchatel (Switzerland). In 1998, he was appointed by CNR as beamline scientist of the Advanced Photoelectric Effect Experiment (APE) beamline at Elettra; he had a leading role in the design, construction and operation of the whole experimental setup, fully operational since 2003. He is presently in charge of the activity “phase transition and magnetic properties in strongly correlated oxides, metal-semiconductor interfaces and anomalous metals” involving three research groups at IOM, where the focus is on the study of correlated systems and novel quantum materials via Synchrotron Radiation.
About the Talk
Exploiting the unique combination of high quality and well characterized topological insulators samples and studying the unique angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy facility in UBC's Quantum Materials Lab.
Dr. Kitche Magak
Dr. Kitche Magak, April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Geographies of belonging: Arts explorations in Kenya

Dr. Kitche Magak
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Dr. Kitche Magak
Professor of Literature, Maseno University, Kenya April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Geographies of belonging: Arts explorations in Kenya

About the Author
Dr. Kitche Magak is a Professor of Literature at Maseno University in Kenya, within the School of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of Literary Studies.
About the Talk
Belonging. We want to belong to each other and need to feel a part of our communities. Yet, forced migration and social isolation contribute to people losing their sense of connection. How do people re-imagine their communities as places of belonging in the midst of conflict and rapid change?
Dr. Rana Nayar
Dr. Rana Nayar, April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Punjabi theatre and the Komagata Maru: Colonial and post-colonial encounters

Dr. Rana Nayar
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Dr. Rana Nayar
Professor, Panjab University, India April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Punjabi theatre and the Komagata Maru: Colonial and post-colonial encounters

About the Author
Dr. Rana Nayar is Professor, Department of English & Cultural Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh. His main areas of interest are: World Drama/Theatre, Translation Studies, Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.
About the Talk
Dr. Nayar proposes to position Punjabi drama within the larger frame of Punjabi language and literature and also emphasize how it has developed historically. His main objective is to delineate the fault-lines between the arrival of Komagata Maru – a Japanese ship loaded with Ghadarites on the shores of Vancouver – Punjab history, Punjab Drama and the Ghadar Movement, to externalize both the ruptures and the continuities within the larger frame of colonial and post-colonial narratives developing in India.
Dr. Christian Giaume
Dr. Christian Giaume, April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Targeting glial connexin channels for treatment of neurological disease

Dr. Christian Giaume
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Dr. Christian Giaume
Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Collège de France, France April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Targeting glial connexin channels for treatment of neurological disease

About the Author
Dr. Giaume is specifically interested in the function of these connexin channels in the brain, and has focused on the role of these channels in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimers.
About the Talk
This talk explores the role of a unique type of channel called a “gap junction channel” that are composed by a family of membrane proteins called connexins. These junctional channels join adjacent cells in every organ of the body including the brain. They allow a variety of small molecules to pass freely from cell to cell, coupling the cells metabolically and allowing them to coordinate their responses to various signals. Alternatively, connexins also form hemichannels which allow the uptake and release of signalling molecules. The importance of gap junction channels and hemichannels has become evident with the identification of diseases resulting from mutations or altered expression in gap junction channel genes, including neurological disorders, congenital cataracts, deafness, heart defects and skin diseases.
Dr. Alexandre Carter
Dr. Alexandre Carter, April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Effects of learning and unlearning on brain connectivity

Dr. Alexandre Carter
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Dr. Alexandre Carter
Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Washington at St. Louis, USA April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Effects of learning and unlearning on brain connectivity

About the Author
Dr. Carter is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury in the Department of Neurology and sees patients at the Comprehensive Outpatient Stroke Clinic in the Center for Advanced Medicine and at The Rehabilitation Institute of Saint Louis. Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United-States and the third leading cause of death at a cost of over $70 billion a year. For a long time it has been thought that nothing could be done to enhance a stroke patient's recovery. This nihilistic view was fed by many long held beliefs about the brain that are oversimplifications, and by a lack of tools to measure and modulate brain activity. We now know that the brain is organized as a set of interconnected, distributed networks, that it is capable of self-repair and of adaptive plasticity when repair is not possible. Dr. Carter's work is centered on understanding the mechanisms of brain plasticity at the network level to help promote better recovery after stroke. Different techniques that are being used to understand distributed brain networks include resting state functional connectivity MRI, non-invasive brain stimulation, as well as more traditional activity-based therapies. This work will also help clinicians better determine which patients are more likely to benefit from which therapies, and promote more of an evidence-based approach to neurorehabilitation. Dr. Carter is also active in promoting stroke awareness and the message of primary and secondary stroke prevention through his involvement in The Rehabilitation Institute's Patient and Family Stroke Education Series and in the wider Saint Louis community.
About the Talk
An overview of Dr. Carter's work while at the Institute as an International Visiting Research Scholar. While at UBC he focused on neuroplasticity – the changing patterns of brain activity associated with task performance, therapeutic treatment, learning or with any change in brain state.
Dr. Derek Gregory
Dr. Derek Gregory, April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Drones and spaces of exception

Dr. Derek Gregory
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Dr. Derek Gregory
Peter Wall Distinguished Professor and Department of Geography, University of British Columbia April 28, 2014
Peter Wall International Research Colloquium

Drones and spaces of exception

About the Author
Dr. Gregory is a member of the Department of Geography at UBC, which recruited him as a full Professor in 1989. The University appointed him Peter Wall Distinguished Professor from 1 July 2011. Dr. Gregory trained as an historical geographer at the University of Cambridge. One year after his BA he was appointed University Assistant Lecturer in Geography and elected a Fellow of Sidney Sussex College. Over the next sixteen years his research focused on the historical geography of industrialization and on the relations between social theory and human geography, using each program of research to inform and advance the other. He focused on processes of historical and geographical change – on periods of crisis and transformation – and explored a range of critical theories that showed how place, space, and landscape have been involved in the operation and outcome of social processes.
About the Talk
Dr. Gregory pays particular attention to the changing ways in which cities (and eventually people) have been visualized as targets within what is now called the ‘kill-chain,’ and to the different ways in which the media have represented and reported bombing to different publics. In this talk, Dr. Gregory provides an in-depth case study surrounding a United States drone strike.
Dr. Michael Wolf
Dr. Michael Wolf, March 27, 2014
Peter Wall Associate lunch talk

New Materials and Technologies for Capturing and Using Solar Energy

Dr. Michael Wolf
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Dr. Michael Wolf
UBC Department of Chemistry March 27, 2014
Peter Wall Associate lunch talk

New Materials and Technologies for Capturing and Using Solar Energy

About the Author
Dr. Wolf works within UBC's Department of Chemistry in the research areas of inorganic, organic and polymer materials chemistry, nanomaterials and molecular electronics.
About the Talk
Growing global energy demands and the potential for environmental catastrophe require a dramatic shift in how we obtain and utilize energy.  The rapid development of renewable "clean" energy sources, as well as methods to store this energy and harness it, are imperative.  Every day, radiation from the sun provides our planet with enough energy to power humanity for a decade.  Recent developments to realize the vast potential of this energy, by development of new and better materials and technologies to harvest, use and store solar energy, will be discussed in this talk.
Timothy Caulfield
Timothy Caulfield, February 20, 2014
Exploratory Workshop public talk

The Policy Challenges and Health Limits of Personalized Medicine

Timothy Caulfield
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Timothy Caulfield
Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy; Professor, University of Alberta February 20, 2014
Exploratory Workshop public talk

The Policy Challenges and Health Limits of Personalized Medicine

About the Author
Timothy Caulfield heads the Faculty of Law’s Health Law and Science Policy Group (HeaLS) at the University of Alberta. He is a Health Senior Scholar (Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research) and the Principal Investigator for interdisciplinary projects that explore the ethical, legal and health policy issues associated with a wide range of topics, including stem cell research, genetics, patient safety, prevention of chronic disease, obesity policy, the commercialization of research, complementary and alternative medicine and access to health care.
About the Talk
Exploring the challenges and opportunities for genomics research on the delivery of personalized primary care medicine.
Dr. Michael Meaney
Dr. Michael Meaney, February 8, 2014
Exploratory Workshop public event

Is Adult Behaviour Determined Early in Life? The Mystery of Epigenetics

Dr. Michael Meaney
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Dr. Michael Meaney
CM, CQ, FRSC, Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University February 8, 2014
Exploratory Workshop public event

Is Adult Behaviour Determined Early in Life? The Mystery of Epigenetics

About the Author
Dr. Meaney is a professor at McGill University specializing in biological psychiatry, neurology, and neurosurgery, who is primarily known for his research on stress, maternal care, and gene expression. His research team discovered the importance of maternal care in modifying the expression of genes that regulate behavioural and neuroendocrine responses to stress, as well as hippocampal synaptic development in animal studies. 
About the Talk
Dr. Meaney discusses his work in behavioural epigenetics, in particular the causal relationship between maternal care, epigenetics and behaviour characteristics in both animals and humans.
Dr. Bonny Norton
Dr. Bonny Norton, February 6, 2014
Peter Wall Associate lunch talk

The African Storybook Project: What questions for research?

Dr. Bonny Norton
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Dr. Bonny Norton
Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education February 6, 2014
Peter Wall Associate lunch talk

The African Storybook Project: What questions for research?

About the Author
Dr. Bonny Norton is a Professor and Distinguished University Scholar in the Department of Language and Literacy Education, UBC. Born and raised in South Africa in the turbulent apartheid years, she learnt at an early age the complex relationship between identity, language learning, and social justice, which are the focus of her research in the international community. She has published widely and received multiple awards for her scholarly contributions. In 2010, she was the inaugural recipient of the “Senior Researcher Award” by the Second Language Research group of AERA (American Educational Research Association), and in 2012 was inducted as an AERA Fellow. Described as developing a new paradigm of research around conceptions of identity and critical pedagogy, she was credited with “changing the face of second language research”. She has been recognized at UBC through the award of a Killam Research Prize and a Killam Teaching Prize.
About the Talk
A discussion on research questions arising from the groundbreaking African Storybook Project, which is developing open-access digital stories to promote the literacy of children in sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Bonny Norton, Chair of the Research Advisory Committee, is helping to develop the African Storybook Research Network, launched in October, 2013, at a Peter Wall Colloquium Abroad in South Africa. Simple questions remain profound: How are digital stories distinct from print stories? How should digital stories be taught? What is the role of parents and policymakers? Who owns open-access digital stories? Can this project advance Nelson Mandela’s legacy in Africa? More information at www.africanstorybook.org.
Dr. Jamie Peck
Dr. Jamie Peck, January 16, 2014
Institute Associates Lunch

In Pursuit of Liberty: On the Trail of the Free-Market Think Tanks

Dr. Jamie Peck
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Dr. Jamie Peck
Professor, Department of Geography, UBC January 16, 2014
Institute Associates Lunch

In Pursuit of Liberty: On the Trail of the Free-Market Think Tanks

Dr. Philippe Descola
Dr. Philippe Descola, September 19, 2013
UBIAS Conference

What is Anthropological Knowledge?

Dr. Philippe Descola
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Dr. Philippe Descola
University-Based Institutes for Advanced Study (UBIAS) Conference September 19, 2013
UBIAS Conference

What is Anthropological Knowledge?

About the Author
Dr. Philippe Descola serves as Chair in Anthropology of Nature, at the Collège de France, and is a 2013 Peter Wall Distinguished Visiting Scholar. With a background in philosophy, Dr. Descola specializes in the relations that human societies establish with nature. His ethnographic work in Ecuador revolutionized anthropological research in Amazonia. Gradually extending his scope to other societies and looking beyond the opposition between nature and culture, Dr. Descola has redefined the dialectic that structures humankind’s relationship with the world and with other beings. Dr. Descola is the originator of “relational ecology”, the investigation of relations between humans, as well as between humans and non-humans. His most recent work focuses on how universal modes of identification interact with modes of figuration and the use of images. Since 2011, Descola has been working on an “anthropology of landscape”, identifying the principles of iconic figuration and transfiguration of the environment at work in cultures that have no conventional tradition of landscape representation.
About the Talk
Among the various social sciences that have emerged in the course of the last two centuries, anthropology remains, probably, the only one still pondering over the definition of its subject matter. To proclaim that it deals with mankind as a special species is hardly enlightening, since other sciences have the same general objective, and they apply to it more specialized methods than those anthropologists can boast of. True anthropologists draw their public recognition from the mastery of a specific body of knowledge using data they have gathered the world over.
Professor Stephen Toope
Professor Stephen Toope, September 19, 2013
UBIAS Conference

The Challenge for Scientific and Academic Knowledge

Professor Stephen Toope
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Professor Stephen Toope
University-Based Institutes for Advanced Study (UBIAS) Conference September 19, 2013
UBIAS Conference

The Challenge for Scientific and Academic Knowledge

About the Author
Professor Stephen Toope serves as President of the University of British Columbia and Chair of the Board for the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies. An International Law scholar who represented Western Europe and North America on the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances from 2002-2007, Professor Toope’s academic interests include public international law, legal theory, human rights, international dispute resolution, and family law.
About the Talk
Professor Stephen Toope explores the line, perhaps drawn unintentionally, between scientific and academic knowledge.
Chaired by Professor Michelle LeBaron
Chaired by Professor Michelle LeBaron
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Chaired by Professor Michelle LeBaron
University-Based Institutes for Advanced Study (UBIAS) Conference September 19, 2013
UBIAS conference

The Art and Science of Resilience: A Cross-Disciplinary Exploration of Arts in Knowledge Generation, Translation and Dissemination

About the Author
This panel was chaired by Professor Michelle LeBaron, Faculty of Law, UBC and Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies Distinguished Scholar in Residence 2013-2014. Panelists included Professor Kim Berman, Associate Professor in Visual Art at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa; Dr. Cynthia Cohen, Director of the Program in Peacebuilding and the Arts, Brandeis University, United States; Dr. Peter Reiner, Professor, National Core for Neuroethics, UBC and Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies Faculty Associate; Dr. Mary Ann Hunter, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Education, University of Tasmania, Australia
About the Talk
Generating new kinds of knowledge: Resilience, understood as a quality of systems that allows them to recover strength and coherence after trauma, is vital to both individuals and communities. Recent scholarly work on resilience fields as diverse as neuroscience, conflict studies and education, attests to the timeliness of efforts to deepen theoretical and practical understandings of resilience and approaches to restoring and enhancing it. Capacities to strengthen resilience will benefit from the integration of insights from diverse bodies of knowledge, including intercultural community perspectives and practices. We will engage participants in experiential exploration of the meaning of resilience from their home disciplines, and its resonance across cultures as a concept, a quality of systems and a set of processes; and distill results from the roundtable on the heuristic robustness of resilience across cultures and disciplines in our accompanying paper. Translating knowledge across disciplines and between the academy and communities: When existing structures and processes are strained by the multidimensional complexities of crisis, the arts can be crafted to increase social cohesion and capacities for agency. They assist with managing transitions, addressing conflicts, and facilitating healing. The arts provide ways of integrating intellectual, emotional, and physical narratives—a serious need in the midst or aftermath of serious conflict. The arts are powerful vehicles for translating knowledge across both disciplinary and community boundaries. We will demonstrate the potency of the arts to translate knowledge across community fault-lines through film clips and discussion; offer experiential opportunities for conference participants to explore the efficacy of arts-methods in communicating abstract theoretical ideas across disciplines; and distill research and scholarship on the efficacy of arts in knowledge translation and social transformation in our accompanying paper. Disseminating knowledge and capacity for resilience via the arts: Understandings of the capacity for resilience have been considerably enhanced by recent work in neuroscience. Communicating these and other scholarly contributions to communities who need them is challenging because of the exclusivity of discipline-based language, conceptual complexities and the abstract nature of the work. The arts are a promising vehicle for communicating understandings of resilience because they accommodate paradox, embrace complexity and offer experiential bridges to dynamic ideas. The panel will offer experiential examples of how resilience findings can be communicated via multi-modal arts; and distill findings on arts as a vehicle for knowledge dissemination using examples from various global projects on post-conflict reconciliation in our accompanying paper.
Dr. Brett Finlay and Dr. Philippe Sansonetti
Dr. Brett Finlay and Dr. Philippe Sansonetti
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Dr. Brett Finlay and Dr. Philippe Sansonetti
University-Based Institutes for Advanced Study (UBIAS) Conference September 18, 2013
UBIAS Conference

The Knowledge Pipeline: Translating Basic Findings Into Society; and Unraveling the Depth of our Symbiosis with Microbes. How Much will it Affect Medicine?

About the Author
Dr. Brett Finlay, FRSC, OC, holds appointments at the Michael Smith Laboratories and in the Departments of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Microbiology & Immunology at UBC. He was appointed a Peter Wall Distinguished Professor in July 2002. Dr. Finlay's areas of research interest and accomplishment include host-parasite interactions of pathogenic bacteria, especially enteric bacteria, and pioneering the use of polarized epithelial cells as models to study pathogenic bacteria penetrating through epithelial barriers. Research in his lab is focused on understanding bacterial pathogenesis from the perspective of both pathogen and host. Dr. Philippe Sansonetti was a Peter Wall 2011 Distinguished Visiting Professor and is one of Europe’s leading microbiologists. His research mainly focuses on the understanding of several aspects of the pathogenesis of Shigella, a Gram-negative bacterium causing severe diarrhea. This work spans a large set of disciplines in biology and medicine and ranges from molecular genetics, to cell biology, immunology and the development of vaccines against dysentery. He also actively contributes to the development of vaccine candidates against the major shigellae causing dysentery in the developing world.
About the Talk
In this keynote address Dr. Brett Finlay speaks on "The Knowledge Pipeline: Translating Basic Findings Into Society", while Dr. Philippe Sansonetti explores "Unraveling the Depth of Our Symbiosis with Microbes. How Much will it Affect Medicine?"
Dr. Anne Cheng
Dr. Anne Cheng, September 17, 2013
UBIAS Conference

The French Invention of Sinology as an Academic Discipline

Dr. Anne Cheng
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Dr. Anne Cheng
University-Based Institutes for Advanced Study (UBIAS) Conference September 17, 2013
UBIAS Conference

The French Invention of Sinology as an Academic Discipline

About the Author
Chair of Chinese Intellectual History, Collège de France Born in Paris in 1955 to Chinese parents, Dr. Anne Cheng was educated in the French state school system, focusing on classics and European language and literature, until she entered the École Normale Supérieure, where she opted to devote herself exclusively to Chinese studies. For almost thirty years she has been involved in teaching and research on the intellectual history of China and Confucianism, initially at the CNRS (French National Center for Scientific Research), then at INALCO (National Institute for Oriental Languages and Civilizations). She was then appointed to the Institut universitaire de France, followed by her election to the Collège de France in 2008.
About the Talk
Dr. Anne Cheng's Keynote Address explores the formation of the academic discipline of Sinology, a subject that has been the focus of much scrutiny and ongoing discussion and debate in recent decades.
Chaired by Professor Takaho Ando
Chaired by Professor Takaho Ando, September 17, 2013
UBIAS Conference Panel

International Dispersion of Knowledge

Chaired by Professor Takaho Ando
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Chaired by Professor Takaho Ando
University-Based Institutes for Advanced Study (UBIAS) Conference September 17, 2013
UBIAS Conference Panel

International Dispersion of Knowledge

About the Author
This panel was chaired by Professor Takaho Ando, Director and Professor, Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Japan. Speakers included Associate Professor Dapeng Cai, Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Japan; Professor Yunqian Chen, Nanjing University Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, China; and Professor Kirill O. Thompson, Associate Dean and Professor, Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
About the Talk
Knowledge repeatedly disperses across national borders. Adapted to local contexts, it influences the formation of cultural and social institutions in different regions. This session examines the international exchange of knowledge between the East and the West, in particular the dispersion of the European knowledge to Asian countries. It discusses how the introduction of the European culture has shaped the Asian societies, with the focus on the history of modernization.
Dr. Shelly Johnson
Dr. Shelly Johnson, September 17, 2013
UBIAS Conference

Embedding Indigenous Learning in Scientific and Academic Knowledge

Dr. Shelly Johnson
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Dr. Shelly Johnson
University-Based Institutes for Advanced Study (UBIAS) Conference September 17, 2013
UBIAS Conference

Embedding Indigenous Learning in Scientific and Academic Knowledge

About the Author
Dr. Shelly Mukwa Musayett Johnson is Saulteaux (Keeseekoose First Nation-Treaty 4) and Norwegian. Her work is in the areas of Indigenous child well-being, trauma and education, political and Indigenous women''s community-based leadership, justice, advocacy and activism. She is a research advisor to the provincial Siem Smuneem Indigenous Child Welfare Research Network. Her academic and research interests reflect Indigenist and critical approaches that contest racism, settler colonialism, and imperialism in their interaction, creation and maintenance of systems of domination, dispossession, violence, criminalization, expropriation and exploitation. Dr. Johnson holds a Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy from UBC, a Master of Social Work from the University of Northern British Columbia, and a Bachelor of Social Work from the University of Victoria.
About the Talk
Dr. Johnson explores embedding Indigenous knowledge, including ways of knowing, doing and being, into Western scientific and academic institutions.
Judith Butler
Judith Butler, March 24, 2013
The Wall Exchange

A Politics of the Street

Judith Butler
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Judith Butler
The Wall Exchange Spring 2012 March 24, 2013
The Wall Exchange

A Politics of the Street

About the Author
Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley and Hannah Arendt Professor of Philosophy at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee, Switzerland.
About the Talk
A Politics of the Street. What is happening when bodies amass in the public square, the university commons, and the street, or when they gather for episodic occupations? It seems we are in the midst of a new form of politics, one that depends upon bodies amassed and moving together, holding firm, sitting still, and even sleeping in public. Whether resistance in the streets of Vancouver, Madrid, or Athens, the coming together of bodies in coordinated protest worldwide takes new forms, even as it calls upon more classical ideals of public action. Can we say that this is a new politics of the body? This lecture will pursue the question: has contemporary politics taken a bodily turn? Or have street actions become so media-driven that we are witnessing a disembodiment of the public sphere? What role does the body play in a politics of the street?
Tom Grigliatti
Tom Grigliatti, November 28, 2012
Wall Associates' Dinner

Personalized Medicine: The Promise of Pharmacogenetics

Tom Grigliatti
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Tom Grigliatti
Wall Associates' Dinner November 28, 2012
Wall Associates' Dinner

Personalized Medicine: The Promise of Pharmacogenetics

About the Author
Tom Grigliatti's research work has encompassed a variety of topics and organisms. His very early work, where he created conditional paralytic mutants in the fruit fly, Drosophila, helped establish the field of neurogenetics. Later, he turned his attention to identifying genes and mutations in chromatin remodeling proteins, and this work help found the now rapidly expanding field of epigenetics. In the last 7 or 8 years he's used functional genomics and proteomics to focus on several different areas of human health. Along the way, he developed technology that allows the functional reconstruction of virtually any portion of the human proteome in cells grown in tissue culture. In addition to defining the genes/proteins that are both necessary and sufficient for the function any specific physiological pathway or process and how naturally occurring mutations in these genes alter the outcome, the technology serves as a platform for drug discovery and development. Dr. Grigliatti came to UBC in 1977. In addition to being a Professor in the Life Sciences Institute, he is an Associate Member of both the Dept. of Medical Genetics (Fac. of Medicine), and the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. He is a member of several international research consortia, including the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries, the Centre for Complex Disorders, Autism Spectrum Disorders-CARC, and the Centre for Drug Discovery and Development. He has also been an advisor to NASA and the Canadian Space Agency for design and research on the space station.
About the Talk
For decades, the pharmaceutical industry has taken the "one drug fits all" approach. These days, we are barraged with advertisements that encourage us to consult with our doctor about a drug that might help us cope with some ailment, but following some testimonials about the drug's utility, there is a litany of potential side effects. Can it be true that in doctors' offices world-wide, patients are given medications that either don't work for them, or cause severe adverse effects? Additionally, with a number of different drugs available for each ailment, many patients must return to their doctor several times until they find, by trial and error, a drug that works for them. Pharmacogenetics promises a day when, using your personal genotype, your doctor eliminates drugs from which you would derive little or no benefit, and/or those for which you may have adverse effects, and instead finds a drug that benefits you, with very minor or no adverse effects. Is this promise probable or fanciful?
Martin Rees
Martin Rees, October 15, 2012
The Wall Exchange

A Cosmic Perspective for the 21st Century

Martin Rees
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Martin Rees
The Wall Exchange Fall 2012 October 15, 2012
The Wall Exchange

A Cosmic Perspective for the 21st Century

About the Author
Sir Martin Rees, eminent astronomer, Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics, University of Cambridge, and Astronomer Royal.
About the Talk
Our cosmos began more than 13 billion years: we are beginning to understand how atoms, stars and planets emerged, and how, on our own planet, Darwinian evolution led to the emergence of creatures able to ponder their origins. Over the whole of science, advances proceed apace, revealing remarkable insights, and opening up an ever-widening range of applications -- both opportunities and threats. We live on an ever more interconnected and crowded planet, where each person is empowered by transformative technology and increasingly demanding of resources. There is a widening gulf between what science enables us to do, and what it's prudent or ethical actually to do. The Earth has existed for 45 million centuries but this is the first when one species, ours, can determine the long-range planetary future. The stakes are high; optimum policies require a longer-term and less parochial perspective than normally prevails in political debate, the deployment of the best scientific advice, and engagement of a wider public. In science itself, the most dramatic conceptual advances are the least predictable. But, in scanning these intellectual horizons, we must be mindful that there may be fundamental limits to our understanding -- key aspects of reality that human brains (even computer-aided) can't grasp.
Michael Chandler
Michael Chandler, September 26, 2012
Wall Associates' Dinner

Selfhood Under Siege: Links to Suicide in Indigenous & Non-Indigenous Youth

Michael Chandler
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Michael Chandler
Wall Associates' Dinner September 26, 2012
Wall Associates' Dinner

Selfhood Under Siege: Links to Suicide in Indigenous & Non-Indigenous Youth

About the Author
Dr. Michael Chandler, Professor Psychology
About the Talk
Motivated by a concern that various ongoing post-colonial practices set special obstacles in the path of young Indigenous persons, Dr. Chandler's research examines the comparative course of identity development as it unfolds in both First Nations and non-Indigenous Canadian youth. In his talk, he will offer a possible line of explanation for the dramatic differences known to divide those Indigenous communities that suffer highly elevated rates of youth suicide from other 'bands' or 'tribes' in which suicide and other manifestations of a loss of futurity are largely absent.
Maxwell Cameron
Maxwell Cameron, February 29, 2012
Faculty Associates Forum

Between Rules and Practice: Practical Wisdom in Constitutional Democracies

Maxwell Cameron
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Maxwell Cameron
Professor of Political Science, and 2011 Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence February 29, 2012
Faculty Associates Forum

Between Rules and Practice: Practical Wisdom in Constitutional Democracies

About the Talk
Why are politicians seen as untrustworthy? Why do we hold parties and parliament in such contempt? This talk will ask how we can make our democracy stronger and more vigorous by empowering parliament, reducing the toxicity of partisanship, and engaging citizens in more meaningful forms of deliberation. This can be done, I argue, not with more rules or regulations, but by improving the way that the roles and offices in our constitutional democracy are practiced. Aristotle used the words �practical wisdom� to describe the kind of moral skill and will necessary for a flourishing democracy. I will explore some of the ways that practical wisdom is still relevant � and needed � today.
Kenneth Sharpe
Kenneth Sharpe
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Kenneth Sharpe
Political Science February 9, 2012
Workshops & Colloquia

Practical Wisdom and Its Enemies: Nurturing Good Character in an Age of Rules and Incentives

About the Author
Kenneth Sharpe is a William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Political Science at Swarthmore College, PA and the author of "Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to do the Right Thing" (with Barry Schwartz). Professor Sharpe specializes in political philosophy, public policy and U.S. foreign policy. He is currently a visiting professor in the Department of Political Science at UBC, where he is teaching a course on practical wisdom.
Rena Sharon
Rena Sharon, January 25, 2012
Faculty Associates Forum

Art Song - An Endangered Species?

Rena Sharon
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Rena Sharon
UBC School of Music and 2011 Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence January 25, 2012
Faculty Associates Forum

Art Song - An Endangered Species?

About the Talk
When an art form thrives for centuries and then begins to vanish, what is at risk? If we think of it as part of the world "artistic ecosystem", has it perhaps run its course as a species? Or does it need to be rescued? Would some subtle forfeit bear long-range consequence to the world if it disappeared? This talk and mini-concert focuses on Art Song, the fusion of poetry of 100 languages with music from around the globe. It is the meeting place of verbal and non-verbal communication modalities, a key code to classical music, a synaesthetic experience of poetry, a journal of a composer's interior realm. Despite those fascinating attributes, Art Song as a performance genre is in such erosion that some have labelled it a non-performative "archival art". Since songs must be sung to fulfill their existence, 100,000 art works may become functionally extinct. In researching innovative solutions for its renewal, UBC's Vancouver International Song Institute resides at the flashpoint of controversy between tradition and change. Would it matter if Art Song vanished? Hear some performed by students and alumni of UBC School of Music, and decide for yourself!
Patricia S. Churchland
Patricia S. Churchland, January 24, 2012
Workshops & Colloquia

What is the Role for Rules in Social Behavior?

Patricia S. Churchland
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Patricia S. Churchland
Professor Emerita, Philosophy, University of California, San Diego, and Adjunct Professor, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego, and UBC Cecil and Ida Green Visiting Professor January 24, 2012
Workshops & Colloquia

What is the Role for Rules in Social Behavior?

About the Author
Professor Churchland's research focuses on the interface between neuroscience and philosophy. She is author of the groundbreaking book, Neurophilosophy (MIT Press 1986), co-author of The Computational Brain (MIT 1992), On The Contrary (MIT 1998) and author of Brain-Wise (MIT 2002). Her current work focuses on morality and the social brain, and appeared in Braintrust: What Neuroscience tells us about Morality, (Princeton University Press 2011). She has been president of the American Philosophical Association and the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, and won a MacArthur Prize in 1991 and the Rossi Prize in 2008.
About the Talk
Recent developments in the neuroscience of social bonding, the psychology of problem-solving, and the role of imitation in social behavior jointly suggest an approach to morality that meshes with evolutionary biology. The basic platform for morality is attachment and bonding, and the caring behavior motivated by such attachment. This hypothesis connects to a different, but currently unfashionable tradition, beginning with Aristotle's ideas about social virtues, and David Hume's 18th century ideas concerning the moral sentiment. One surprising outcome of the convergence of scientific approaches is that the revered dictum -- you cannot infer an ought from an is -- looks dubious as a general rule restricting moral (practical) problem solving.
Timothy Stainton
Timothy Stainton, November 16, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

In from the Margins: New Foundations for Personhood and Legal Capacity in the 21st Century

Timothy Stainton
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Timothy Stainton
UBC School of Social Work November 16, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

In from the Margins: New Foundations for Personhood and Legal Capacity in the 21st Century

About the Talk
Challenge: Article 12 of The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities affirms the rights of persons with disabilities to receive recognition as persons before the law and calls on State Parties to recognize that persons with disabilities enjoy legal capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of life and to take appropriate measures to provide access to the support they may require in exercising their legal capacity. Considerations include: 1) the conceptual foundations of moral and legal personhood; 2) the definition and criteria for legal capacity found in ethics and law; 3) implications for law and policy for adult protection, substitute and supported decision-making, health and social care consent, contract and criminal law; and 4) emerging social and legal forms of support and reasonable accommodation that enable people with significant cognitive or psychosocial disabilities to maximize their legal capacity. Dr. Stainton led a Wall Exploratory Workshop to examine from a 'ground up' perspective the issues raised by Article 12.
David Olson
David Olson
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David Olson
Human Development and Education November 15, 2011
Workshop and Colloquia

The Search for the Beginnings of Wisdom: Agency, Intentionality and Responsibility in Childhood

About the Author
David R. Olson is University Professor Emeritus of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education/University of Toronto. He a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and holds Honorary Doctorates from Gothenberg University (1994) and the University of Saskatchewan (1996). He has published extensively on language, literacy and cognition, including the widely anthologized article "From utterance to text: The bias of language in speech and writing" (Harvard Educational Review, 1977). His book The World on Paper: The conceptual and Cognitive Implication of Writing and Reading (Cambridge, 1994) has been translated into eight languages. He is co-editor with Nancy Torrance of The Cambridge Handbook of Literacy (2009) and The Handbook of Education and Human Development (Blackwell, 1996), coeditor with Michael Cole of Technology, Literacy and the Evolution of Society: Implications of the Work of Jack Goody (Erlbaum, 2006), coeditor with Janet Astington and Paul Harris of Developing Theories of Mind (Cambridge, 1988), co-editor with Janet Astington and Philip Zelazo of Developing Theories of Intention (Erlbarm, 1998), co-editor with Nancy Torrance of Literacy and Orality (Cambridge, 1991), and with Nancy Torrance and Angela Hildyard of Literacy, Language and Learning (Cambridge University Press, 1985). His most recent authored books are Psychological Theory and Educational Reform: How School Remakes Mind And Society (Cambridge, 2003) and Jerome Bruner: The Cognitive Revolution in Educational Theory (Continuum, 2007).
About the Talk
This talk was part of the Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence Public Talk Series on Practical Wisdom organized by Maxwell Cameron, UBC Political Science, and co-sponsored with Green College.
Guy Dumont
Guy Dumont, October 26, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Comfortably Numb: Cruise Control for Anesthesia

Guy Dumont
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Guy Dumont
Electrical & Computer Engineering and 2011 Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence October 26, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Comfortably Numb: Cruise Control for Anesthesia

About the Talk
Computer control has become ubiquitous in our daily lives, from cruise control to autopilots, from anti-lock braking systems to DVD players. Many of modern-life's devices would not be possible if it were not for sophisticated control theory working in conjunction with high performance sensors and actuators. Early and premature attempts at automating drug delivery in the operating room took place as early as 1950. However, it is only in the last decade that the prospects of fully automatic control of drug delivery for anesthesia have become serious. This talk will present some recent efforts toward measuring and controlling the effects of anesthetic drugs automatically, in a system akin to a cruise controller or an autopilot for anesthesiologists. Technical challenges and potential benefits of such a system will also be discussed.
Richard Unger
Richard Unger, September 28, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Energy Consumption and the Environmental Impact of the Black Death

Richard Unger
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Richard Unger
History and 2011 Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence September 28, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Energy Consumption and the Environmental Impact of the Black Death

About the Talk
In the mid fourteenth century European population fell by between 40 and 50 per cent. The demographic disaster affected almost all aspects of life in the short term and less obviously but equally emphatically in the long term. Total energy consumption went down with population and the shrinking of settlement meant land went out of cultivation. The retreat of the humans did not mean a straightforward reversion of large tracts of land to some wild state because of the various ways in which people reacted to a world with a much smaller numbers of them. Europeans relied on agriculture as the principal source of energy to sustain their way of life. An effort to calculate energy consumption by Europeans before and after the Black Death indicates the problems of trying to generate reliable data for large populations in the years before there were governments to publish aggregate figures. More important the results, despite considerable potential error, show that the impact on the environment varied and human strategies, dictated by economics, technology, psychology and tastes, mitigated any dramatic changes in the ways people dealt with the natural world around them. The Black Death did in some ways liberate the survivors to explore new ways to use what they could extract from nature.
Alain Berthoz
Alain Berthoz, September 27, 2011
Wall Special Event Video

Video interview with Dr. Alain Berthoz

Alain Berthoz
Founding Director of the Laboratory of Physiology of Perception and Action (LPPA) of CNRS and Honorary Professor at the College de France, Paris September 27, 2011
Wall Special Event Video

Video interview with Dr. Alain Berthoz

About the Author
Alain Berthoz is a leading neurophysiologist and an honorary professor at the prestigious College de France where he holds the Chair of Perception and Action Physiology. Pr. Berthoz studies the neuronal bases of the four main cognitive and motor functions commanding eye movement, locomotion, space-memory strategies and the perception of the emotional expressions and actions of others.
About the Talk
After a first visit at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies in 2009, Pr Berthoz came back to UBC in September 2011 as a Wall Distiguished Returning Professor. In this interview he tells us about the applications of his research in real life. Through the concept of "Simplexity", he also explains how living organisms find solutions to the world complexity; he considers the role of sensitive experience in our society and touches on the Chinese concept of "Wu-Wei". Video courtesy of the French Consulate, Vancouver.
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Derek Gregory
Derek Gregory, September 26, 2011
The Wall Exchange

The Everywhere War

Derek Gregory
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Derek Gregory
UBC Department of Geography and Wall Distinguished Professor September 26, 2011
The Wall Exchange

The Everywhere War

About the Author
Dr. Gregory is a renowned political geographer whose honours include honorary degrees from one of Europe's youngest (Roskilde) and oldest (Heidelberg) universities, elections to the Royal Society of Canada and the British Academy, the Founder's Medal of the Royal Geographical Society, and, most recently, the invitation to present the British Academy's Annual Lecture in London in 2012. His distinctions also include a UBC Killam Research Prize, a UBC Killam Teaching Prize, and a UBC Killam Prize for Graduate Mentoring. His former doctoral students, twenty-seven to date, have moved into positions of influence among the world's top universities.
About the Talk
In this talk Dr. Gregory speaks on "The Everywhere War" - wars conducted in the shadows of 9/11 that have much to tell us about the future of violence, security, and everyday life. Many commentators have claimed that the face of war has changed dramatically since 9/11: they talk not just of 'new wars' but, crucially, of 'endless war', 'unending war', and what New York Times reporter Dexter Filkins calls the 'forever war'. All of these descriptions focus on time, which means that they all overlook the importance of the slippery spaces through which war now takes place. One of the characteristics of late modern war is the eventful quality of violence that can, in principle, occur anywhere: a commuter train in Madrid, a house in Gaza City, a poppy field in Helmand, or a street in Ciudad Juarez. I want to show how what I call the everywhere war has changed the very nature of war in the early twenty-first century. The killing space still has a terrible intimacy, but we now live in a world where death can be delivered across vast distances and successive American administrations openly speculate about how to conduct war in countries we are not at war with. All this makes it hard to see where war ends and peace begins. To bring these changes into view, and to think about their implications, I examine three cases in which the global North reaches deep into the global borderlands: the use of drones (UAVs) in Afghanistan-Pakistan by NATO forces and the CIA; the militarization of the US-Mexico border and the prosecution of narco-war; and the emergence of cyber-warfare. Taken together, they have much to tell us about the future of violence, security and everyday life. Recording courtesy of CBC Radio.
Alain Berthoz
Alain Berthoz, September 14, 2011
Wall Special Event Audio

Brain Mechanisms for Empathy and the Cognitive Foundations of Tolerance

Alain Berthoz
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Alain Berthoz
Founding Director of the Laboratory of Physiology of Perception and Action (LPPA) of CNRS and 2011 Returning Wall Distinguished Visiting Professor September 14, 2011
Wall Special Event Audio

Brain Mechanisms for Empathy and the Cognitive Foundations of Tolerance

About the Author
Dr. Alain Berthoz is currently Honorary Professor at the Coll�¨ge de France, Paris, member of the French Academy of Sciences and the Academy of Technologies and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
About the Talk
Understanding others� thoughts, desires, and emotions, and accepting a plurality of opinions and feelings is a fundamental basis of social interaction. Empathy and sympathy allow humans to understand each other. Both are essential for developing respect, social norms, moral behavior, and tolerance. One challenge for modern neuroscience is to try to understand the cognitive basis of empathy. This talk examines recent behavioural and brain imaging studies which contribute to this goal. Also included is a "spatial theory of empathy" which distinguishes between sympathy, a cognitive and emotional resonance process, and empathy as a complex dynamic process requiring manipulation of spatial reference frames, perspective changes, and both simulation and inhibition of emotion. The talk will propose that empathy uses brain mechanisms similar to those for spatial memory and navigation. It also discusses how children develop this capacity, the consequences of deficits of the brain mechanisms involved in empathy in the psychiatry, and the potential risks of preventing empathy during development at "critical periods" in children, leading them to make intolerant judgments.
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Philippe Sansonetti
Philippe Sansonetti, June 22, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: A Fair Scenario for our Microbial Environment?

Philippe Sansonetti
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Philippe Sansonetti
Professor and Chair, Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, College de France, and Professor, Pasteur Institute, Paris, and 2011 Wall Distinguished Visiting Professor June 22, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: A Fair Scenario for our Microbial Environment?

About the Author
Philippe Sansonetti is one of Europe�s leading microbiologists. His research mainly focuses on the understanding of several aspects of the pathogenesis of Shigella, a Gram-negative bacterium causing severe diarrhea. This work spans a large set of disciplines in biology and medicine and ranges from molecular genetics, to cell biology, immunology and the development of vaccines against dysentery. He also actively contributes to the development of vaccine candidates against the major shigellae causing dysentery in the developing world.
About the Talk
In this lecture, Professor Sansonetti provides a global view of the nature of the microbes that humans are facing, from the truly symbiotic/mutualistic ones constituting our permanent microbiota to the pathogenic ones that affect our health by causing infections. As usual, nature isn�t black and white, and an increasing grey zone appears between these two well-defined categories that encompasses the so called pathobionts whose functions seem essential in shaping our immune system which has evolved under the schizophrenic constraint of keeping the good, rejecting the bad, and dealing with the ugly� In this complex cross talk may reside the major parameters of the Hygiene Hypothesis.
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Philippe Sansonetti
Philippe Sansonetti, June 14, 2011
Wall Special Event Video

Video interview with Dr. Philippe Sansonetti

Philippe Sansonetti
Head, Microbial Pathogeny at the Institut Pasteur, Chair of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, College de France and 2011 Wall Distinguished Visiting Professor June 14, 2011
Wall Special Event Video

Video interview with Dr. Philippe Sansonetti

About the Author
Philippe Sansonetti is one of Europe's leading microbiologists. His research mainly focuses on the understanding of several aspects of the pathogenesis of Shigella, a Gram-negative bacterium causing severe diarrhea. This work spans a large set of disciplines in biology and medicine and ranges from molecular genetics, to cell biology, immunology and the development of vaccines against dysentery. He also actively contributes to the development of vaccine candidates against the major shigellae causing dysentery in the developing world.
About the Talk
Video interview with Dr. Philippe Sansonetti courtesy of the French Consulate, Vancouver. June 2011
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John Steeves
John Steeves, May 25, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Traversing Clinical Trials

John Steeves
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John Steeves
ICORD and 2011 Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence May 25, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Traversing Clinical Trials

About the Talk
Everyone is generally familiar with clinical trials, but what is actually involved in the translation of a promising biomedical discovery to human application. It is a long, complex multi-phase process where each phase has a particular goal and unique set of demands. It requires a rigor uncommon to science, which may explain why many scientists wish others take over the pursuit. Above all else, it is incredibly expensive, with a single drug requiring hundreds of millions to complete all the requirements for approval as a treatment. In this talk, I will outline some of the tough lessons learned when science enters the business world of human studies.
J. Craig Venter
J. Craig Venter, May 3, 2011
The Wall Exchange

Synthetic Life

J. Craig Venter
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J. Craig Venter
Leading genomic scientist and sequencer of the human genome. May 3, 2011
The Wall Exchange

Synthetic Life

About the Talk
Leading genomic scientist and sequencer of the human genome, on the construction of the first synthetic cell and the global ocean sampling expedition. Recording courtesy of CBC Radio.
Fabio Rossi
Fabio Rossi
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Fabio Rossi
Medical Genetics and Biomedical Research Centre and 2011 Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence April 27, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

The Hype About iPS: Ethical and Practical Implications of Recent Advances in Stem Cell Research

About the Talk
Stem cells hold tremendous promise for both therapeutic and commercial applications. However, theoretical, practical, ethical, and regulatory obstacles hinder the path to these achievements. While we wait, scrupleless individuals whom, operating abroad, are not bound by the same regulatory constraints existing in �western� countries give patients false hopes and thrive on �stem cell tourism.� How long before we see these promises realized? Which applications will come first?
Richard Kurth
Richard Kurth, April 13, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Singing Meaning into Lost Childhood in Arcade Fires "The Suburbs"

Richard Kurth
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Richard Kurth
Professor and Director, UBC School of Music April 13, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Singing Meaning into Lost Childhood in Arcade Fires "The Suburbs"

About the Talk
"The Suburbs," by the Montreal-based indie rock band Arcade Fire, was recently awarded Album of the Year in a surprise finish at the 2011 Grammy Awards. The album's words and music are a generation's lament for a childhood overwhelmed by suburban sprawl and the cycles of industrialized consumer economy, and an attempt to define a viable adult identity and future. The music, built in layers, works out ambiguities and ironies, resolving some, and accepting others. The talk will explore how the first two songs (a linked pair) reconfigure familiar features of pop music, symbolically recycling the predictable materials of suburban life, and expressing the sediments of mixed feelings, past and present.
Stanislas Dehaene
Stanislas Dehaene, April 7, 2011
Wall Special Event Video

Reading in the Brain

Stanislas Dehaene
Experimental Cognitive Psychology, College de France and 2011 Wall Distinguished Visiting Professor April 7, 2011
Wall Special Event Video

Reading in the Brain

About the Author
Professor Dehaene is one of Europe's leading cognitive neuroscientists. He uses advanced techniques in functional magnetic resonance imaging, electro-encephalography, interacranial electrodes, and psychological manipulations to study how culture and biology interact in the human brain. His work on the neural bases of reading abilities, mathematical language, bilingualism, and consciousness is internationally known. A prolific, award-winning author, Professor Dehaene is an elected member of the US National Academy of Sciences.
About the Talk
Through education we expand the competences of our human brains beyond those initially provided by evolution. This lecture describes how literacy changes the brain.
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Stanislas Dehaene
Stanislas Dehaene, April 6, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

The Depth and Limits of Subliminal Processing

Stanislas Dehaene
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Stanislas Dehaene
Experimental Cognitive Psychology, College de France and 2011 Wall Distinguished Visiting Professor April 6, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

The Depth and Limits of Subliminal Processing

About the Author
Professor Dehaene is one of Europe's leading cognitive neuroscientists. He uses advanced techniques in functional magnetic resonance imaging, electro-encephalography, interacranial electrodes, and psychological manipulations to study how culture and biology interact in the human brain. His work on the neural bases of reading abilities, mathematical language, bilingualism, and consciousness is internationally known. A prolific, award-winning author, Professor Dehaene is an elected member of the US National Academy of Sciences.
About the Talk
Everybody knows about subliminal images. In the laboratory, we can easily flash visual stimuli so quickly, and in such close temporal proximity to other masking stimuli, that they cannot be consciously perceived. My colleagues and I are using behavioral measurements and images of brain activity to probe the depth of processing of subliminal words and digits in the human brain. The results indicate that subliminal stimuli receive considerable cortical processing. Many stages of reading can unfold without consciousness: visual word recognition, invariance for font and case, semantic access, categorization according to instructions, and even motor preparation all operate non-consciously. The brain is also able to accumulate evidence from several subliminal stimuli presented serially or in parallel. The question then arises: Does non-conscious processing exhibit any limits? Recent experiments suggest that conscious access is needed for some high-level supervisory operations, including the flexible and rational control of our decisions and the chaining of several steps within a non-routine mental algorithm.
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Stanislas Dehaene
Stanislas Dehaene, April 3, 2011
Wall Special Event Video

A video interview with Dr. Stanislas Dehaene

Stanislas Dehaene
Experimental Cognitive Psychology, Collège de France and 2011 Wall Distinguished Visiting Professor April 3, 2011
Wall Special Event Video

A video interview with Dr. Stanislas Dehaene

About the Author
Professor Dehaene is one of Europe's leading cognitive neuroscientists. He uses advanced techniques in functional magnetic resonance imaging, electro-encephalography, interacranial electrodes, and psychological manipulations to study how culture and biology interact in the human brain. His work on the neural bases of reading abilities, mathematical language, bilingualism, and consciousness is internationally known. A prolific, award-winning author, Professor Dehaene is an elected member of the US National Academy of Sciences.
About the Talk
A video interview with Dr. Dehaene courtesy of the Consulat général de France à Vancouver during his visit to the Wall Institute in April 2011.
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Jerrilynn Dodds
Jerrilynn Dodds, March 17, 2011
Workshops & Colloquia

Historic Monuments and the Politics of Cultural Genocide in Bosnia (1991-1994)

Jerrilynn Dodds
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Jerrilynn Dodds
Architectural Historian and Dean of the College, Sarah Lawrence College, New York and UBC Cecil and Ida Green Visiting Professor March 17, 2011
Workshops & Colloquia

Historic Monuments and the Politics of Cultural Genocide in Bosnia (1991-1994)

About the Author
Jerrilynn Dodds is Dean of Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York. In addition to being a lecturer and consultant at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and known as an author and prize-winning documentary filmmaker, she has previously been Distinguished Professor of Architectural History and Theory at the City University of New York. She has also curated numerous museum exhibitions. Her work centers on issues of artistic interchange, and how groups form their identities through art and architecture.
About the Talk
In the Balkan wars of the early 1990s, the destruction of architecture became a tool of successive campaigns of cultural genocide, meant to help erase one or more of the multiple groups who inhabited contested territories. This lecture will explore the architecture of Orthodox, Catholic and Muslim populations of Bosnia, both in historical encounters, and in the devastating wars of the 1990s.
Frank Ko
Frank Ko, March 9, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Nanofibre Technology: New Frontier in Advanced Materials Research

Frank Ko
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Frank Ko
Materials Engineering and Director of AMPEL March 9, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Nanofibre Technology: New Frontier in Advanced Materials Research

About the Talk
Polymeric fibrous materials are the fundamental building blocks of living systems. From the 1.5 nm double helix strand of DNA molecules, including cytoskeleton filaments with diameters around 30 nm; to sensory cells such as hair cells and rod cells of the eyes, nanoscale fibers form the extracellular matrices for tissues and organs. Based upon these blueprints laid out by nature, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the availability of nanoscale (less than 100 nm diameter) fibers made of polymers having adjustable electronic, biological and mechanical properties will not only enable novel biotechnology, neuroscience, microelectronics, and nanoscience research, but also open new opportunities for numerous applications related to health, energy, and environment. After a brief introduction to nanofibre technology the exciting research and commercial opportunities of nanofibre technology will be illustrated through examples of the growing nanofibre-related research activities at UBC.
Gu Xiong
Gu Xiong, February 23, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Waterscapes

Gu Xiong
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Gu Xiong
Art History, Visual Art & Theory and 2002-2003 Wall Early Career Scholar February 23, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Waterscapes

About the Talk
Waterscapes explores the potential of using seas, ocean basins, and river networks as frameworks of historical analysis, highlighting the central role of trans-oceanic relationships and exchanges in the shaping of world regions and identities. They deal with transnational migration along major waterways, globalization, and cultural hybridity, and explore the contemporary and historical meaning of waterscapes in the context of large-scale migrations in/to China and Canada.
Andrew Macnab
Andrew Macnab, February 9, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Creative Spaces for the Mind

Andrew Macnab
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Andrew Macnab
Pediatrics February 9, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Creative Spaces for the Mind

About the Talk
�We must go beyond textbooks, and travel and explore and tell the world of the glories of our journey� � John Hope Franklin. This over arching title will allow reflection on three elements: The time spent with an outstanding group of international Fellows at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Studies (STIAS), which afforded unique opportunities for dialogue and collaborative research. One such collaboration evaluated a Canadian model for school-based health promotion employed in rural communities in sub-Saharan Africa, and the impact this program is having on child health and social behaviors. And another initiative begun to explore how to help new parents acquire knowledge and skills that promote early childhood development; in Canada this now involves UBC researchers and the application of new technologies to make evidence from current research more accessible.
Holger Hoos
Holger Hoos
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Holger Hoos
Computer Science, University of British Columbia and 2010 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence January 26, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

� La recherche de l'intelligence artificielle: Machines That Think, Create and Play

About the Talk
The creation of artificial intelligence (AI) - of machines that think, feel, and communicate like humans do - is one of the great dreams of humankind, and a quest that has been hotly pursued over the last fifty years. Popularised by science fiction novels, films, and a host of colourful characters, visions of AI have become part of mainstream culture. But is AI really possible? And if so, how will it shape our future? While Dr. Hoos cannot provide conclusive or exhaustive answers to these questions, he will attempt to shed some light on what is possible today and speculate on where this may lead us in the future.
More talks by this Author
Benjamin Perrin
Benjamin Perrin, January 12, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Human Trafficking: Research, Advocacy & Action to Address Emerging Social Challenges

Benjamin Perrin
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Benjamin Perrin
Law, University of British Columbia January 12, 2011
Faculty Associates Forum

Human Trafficking: Research, Advocacy & Action to Address Emerging Social Challenges

About the Talk
Professor Benjamin Perrin, author of Invisible Chains: Canada's Underground World of Human Trafficking, shares the compelling story behind researching underground criminal activity in Canada and the multi-faceted public engagement, media and advocacy campaign based on this research for this three-year project. The role of public universities in addressing emerging social challenges is an important theme that is explored through the case study under discussion.
Dan Edelstein
Dan Edelstein, November 26, 2010
Workshops & Colloquia

Rethinking the History of Natural Right

Dan Edelstein
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Dan Edelstein
French, Stanford University November 26, 2010
Workshops & Colloquia

Rethinking the History of Natural Right

About the Author
Dan Edelstein is an Associate Professor of French at Stanford University. His first book, "The Terror of Natural Right: Republicanism, the Cult of Nature, and the French Revolution" (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009) won the 2009 Oscar Kenshur Book Prize. He co-directs the "Mapping the Republic of Letters" project, which uses visualization software to represent the circulation of letters, people, and ideas in the early-modern period.
About the Talk
Scholars tend to study the history of natural right using very traditional methods: great men wrote canonical books which were read by other great men who wrote more canonical books, until finally the French revolutionaries declared the rights of man and of the citizen. But recent works on natural right contest this historiographical approach, and challenge us to rethink the way we write the history of natural right. What if the real question was not one of intellectual lineage, but of cultural acceptance? What made natural right theory a political language that was adopted by a wide range of actors -- and not just employed by the famous philosophers?
Mark Warren
Mark Warren, November 24, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Voting with your feet: Exit-based Empowerment in Democratic Theory.

Mark Warren
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Mark Warren
Political Science, University of British Columbia and 2010 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence November 24, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Voting with your feet: Exit-based Empowerment in Democratic Theory.

About the Talk
Contemporary democratic theory is modeled primarily on membership combined with empowered voice. An alternative to voice, however, is exit: when they have choices, dissatisfied members may choose to leave a collectivity rather than voice their dissatisfactions. But because the concept of exit is often viewed as appropriate only for economic markets, its democratic potentials have not been theorized. The costs to democratic norms are extensive: contemporary theorists implicitly work with a monopoly-based view of organizational power, tacitly approving relationships of domination owing to the formal�¯�¿�½though often ineffective�¯�¿�½presence of voice-based mechanisms. Contemporary democratic theory should be re-thought to include exit-based empowerments as among its most fundamental features.
Michael Wolf
Michael Wolf, November 10, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy Applications

Michael Wolf
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Michael Wolf
Chemistry, University of British Columbia November 10, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy Applications

About the Talk
The emerging energy crisis requires new materials to be found for energy harvesting, generation and storage. Nanomaterials will play a major role in new developments in this important research field in solar energy harvesting and photovoltaic devices (solar cells), power generation and storage, and in gas storage and fuel cells. Transformational technologies will be enabled by the use of nanomaterials as electrodes in batteries, in organic solar cells and as electrodes in fuel cells. Dr. Wolf recently led a Wall Exploratory Workshop to address these issues.
Steven Meyer
Steven Meyer, November 8, 2010
Workshops & Colloquia

Pre-Pragmatisms and Robust Empiricisms: James, Whitehead, Wilson

Steven Meyer
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Steven Meyer
History, Washington University in St. Louis November 8, 2010
Workshops & Colloquia

Pre-Pragmatisms and Robust Empiricisms: James, Whitehead, Wilson

About the Author
Steven Meyer teaches intellectual history at Washington University in St. Louis and is the author of Irresistible Dictation: Gertrude Stein and the Correlations of Writing and Science (2001). Among current projects he is completing Robust Empiricisms: Jamesian Modernism between the Disciplines, 1878 to the Present.
About the Talk
In Wandering Significance (2006), Mark Wilson develops a dissenting "pre-pragmatist," post-Quinean stance with regard to the classical picture of concepts provided by Bertrand Russell in response to late-nineteenth-century crises in classical mechanics and applied mathematics. Although Wilson portrays William James as a "fully fledged" pragmatist, accounts by Isabelle Stengers and Bruno Latour strikingly characterize James in a manner that deserves to be called pre-pragmatist as well. Wilson's historical reconstruction of the crises also makes it possible, perhaps for the first time, to appreciate the motivation they provided for Alfred North Whitehead to move toward what James called a "process philosophy" and toward the more robust empiricism he shares with James and Wilson.
Margaret Schabas
Margaret Schabas, October 27, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Hume on Happiness

Margaret Schabas
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Margaret Schabas
Philosophy, University of British Columbia and 2010 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence October 27, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Hume on Happiness

About the Talk
David Hume (1711-1776), the most influential philosopher to have written in the English language, maintained that happiness was the goal of all human activity. �For this were arts invented, sciences cultivated, laws ordained, and societies modelled.� Hume was also one of the first to analyze and assimilate the rise of commerce and trade, and recognized that the pursuit of luxuries, while a source of happiness, could drive humans onto the wrong developmental path. The significant increase in wealth in Western Europe tended to deplete the stock of non-pecuniary goods, such as friendship, and induce an increase in military expenditures and thus government debt. As would John Maynard Keynes two centuries hence, Hume admired the wealth-creating effects of the capitalist system while deploring its dehumanizing and destabilizing tendencies. This talk outlines Hume�s vision for human prosperity and the pursuit of happiness, both individual and collective.
Edwin Moore
Edwin Moore, October 13, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Nanospace Biophysics

Edwin Moore
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Edwin Moore
Cellular & Physiological Sciences October 13, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Nanospace Biophysics

About the Talk
There is a critical knowledge gap in biology that needs to be addressed: cytoplasmic nanospace biophysics. Some examples of critical cellular processes occurring in nanospaces are excitation-contraction coupling in muscles, cell division, proliferation, intracellular trafficking, the stabilization and control of multiprotein complexes such as cellulose synthases, focal adhesion turnover in cell migration, calcium homeostasis and intracellular signaling. While the traditional deterministic view of these processes is inaccurate, it dominates hypothesis generation in the research community as well as both graduate and undergraduate education. It is therefore necessary to develop appropriate probabilistic models that can be quantitatively analysed to guide future research into both healthy and diseased states, and to provide more accurate visualization tools necessary for research and education. Dr. Moore recently led a Wall Exploratory Workshop to address these issues: www.nanospace.pwias.ubc.ca
Janis Sarra
Janis Sarra
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Janis Sarra
Law, University of British Columbia and 2010 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence September 29, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Pragmatic, Prescient and Prudential: Corporate Governance of Banks in the Wake of the Financial Crisis

About the Talk
The recent financial crisis witnessed the first "runs" on banks in more than 75 years. The collapse of financial institutions placed people's homes, pensions and economic security at risk. The crisis itself was the result of multiple factors, including inappropriate risk taking and inappropriate compensation incentives. Arguably, corporate governance of banks and other financial institutions differs from the governance of corporations because of prudential regulation and the different nature of stakeholders with investments at risk. A highly contested question is the extent to which there ought to be new regulatory oversight of bank governance, or whether there is a need for a more nuanced model of interactive governance. Our collective interest as depositors, investors, and mortgage holders in the effective governance of banks necessitates a new understanding of the incentive effects of various strategies.
Rachel Silvey
Rachel Silvey, June 29, 2010
Workshops & Colloquia

Transnational Migration and Economic Justice

Rachel Silvey
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Rachel Silvey
University of Toronto, Department of Geography June 29, 2010
Workshops & Colloquia

Transnational Migration and Economic Justice

Barbara Grosz
Barbara Grosz, June 25, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Can't You See I'm Busy? Designing Computers that Only Interrupt when they Should

Barbara Grosz
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Barbara Grosz
Dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies June 25, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Can't You See I'm Busy? Designing Computers that Only Interrupt when they Should

About the Talk
Ever been annoyed by a dialogue box that pops up trying to be helpful, but asks something stupid instead? Sometimes a computer system has information that would be helpful to its user; at other times, the system may need information that only its user has. Too often, computer systems control an interaction, forcing their users to accommodate them. Harvard computer scientist and Radcliffe Institute Dean Barbara J. Grosz will describe research that aims to shift the burden of adaptation from human to computer, so that computers respect our needs and adapt to us rather than the other way around.
Brett Finlay
Brett Finlay
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Brett Finlay
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Microbiology & Immunology and Wall Distinguished Professor May 12, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Revisiting the Hygiene Hypothesis - Clean Living and the Effect of Microbiota on Diarrhea and Asthma

About the Talk
The microbiota (normal flora) is comprised of many microbes living in and on our bodies. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the impact of these organisms on our health and disease, impacting on obesity, bowel diseases, type I diabetes, immune development, etc. In developed countries, we have gone to great lengths to minimize our exposure to microbes, both pathogenic and harmless. The Hygiene Hypothesis suggests that perhaps we have gone too far, as hominids have evolved in a sea of microbes and actually need exposure early in life to microbes to minimize allergic diseases, including asthma. Recent work in our lab has begun to explore the role of the microbiota in experimental asthma and infectious diarrhea. We are finding that the microbiota play central roles in these diseases. Recent results in this area will be discussed, as will their implications in our quest to minimize our exposure to microbes.
More talks by this Author
Arthur Ray
Arthur Ray, April 28, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Telling it to the Judge: Historical Evidence and Mètis Rights in Canada

Arthur Ray
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Arthur Ray
History, University of British Columbia April 28, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Telling it to the Judge: Historical Evidence and Mètis Rights in Canada

About the Talk
The Canadian philosopher Ralston Saul declared in his recent acclaimed book, A Fair Country, that Canada is a Mètis nation that should embrace its mixed aboriginal and settler ancestry. Although the sentiment may be admirable, the reality is quite different. Canada’s Mètis people and communities have struggled for their rights through armed conflicts in 1869-70 and in 1885 and thereafter through political activism. A breakthrough was achieved in 1982, when Section 35 of Canada’s new Constitutional Act recognized Mètis as Aboriginal people and protected their existing Aboriginal rights. It would, however, be left to the courts to determine: Who is Mètis? Where do the Mètis live? What cultural practices are distinctly Mètis? Since 1982, these questions have been asked and argued in Canadian courts as Mètis press for legal recognition of their constitutionally protected, but undefined, Aboriginal rights. Along the way, trial and appeal courts have become the arbiters of Canadian Mètis identity and culture. The rising tide of litigation has reinvigorated historical research to both address the courts’ evolving notions of Mètis rights and influence those conceptualizations. Litigation-oriented research, in turn, challenges the existing scholarship on Mètis history. I will discuss this interactive process from the perspective of my involvement as an ethnohistorical geographer who was an expert witness in R. v. Powley (2003) concerning the Mètis of Sault Ste Marie, Ontario. It was the first Mètis rights case to reach the Supreme Court of Canada after 1982. I will also discuss cases in Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan after Powley
Anthony Phillips
Anthony Phillips, April 14, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Epigenetics: A revolution in the making

Anthony Phillips
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Anthony Phillips
Psychiatry, University of British Columbia April 14, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Epigenetics: A revolution in the making

Claire Young
Claire Young, March 24, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Pensions, Privatisation and Poverty: The Gendered Impact

Claire Young
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Claire Young
Law, University of British Columbia March 24, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Pensions, Privatisation and Poverty: The Gendered Impact

Robert Brunham
Robert Brunham, March 10, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Navigating TB Transmission Networks with Genomics and Phylogenetics

Robert Brunham
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Robert Brunham
Infectious Diseases, University of British Columbia March 10, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Navigating TB Transmission Networks with Genomics and Phylogenetics

Alexander Woodside
Alexander Woodside, January 27, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Catastrophe Theory and the Future of Farming (As Seen From China)

Alexander Woodside
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Alexander Woodside
History, University of British Columbia January 27, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Catastrophe Theory and the Future of Farming (As Seen From China)

Susan Cox and George Belliveau
Susan Cox and George Belliveau, January 13, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Arts-Based Methods in Health Research

Susan Cox and George Belliveau
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Susan Cox and George Belliveau
Centre for Applied Ethics and Language & Literacy Education, University of British Columbia January 13, 2010
Faculty Associates Forum

Arts-Based Methods in Health Research

Grant Gillett
Grant Gillett, November 27, 2009
Workshops & Colloquia

Neuroethics and Hysteria: The Mind and Neurological Disorder

Grant Gillett
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Grant Gillett
Medical Ethics, University of Otago Medical School and Cecil H. & Ida Green Visiting Professor November 27, 2009
Workshops & Colloquia

Neuroethics and Hysteria: The Mind and Neurological Disorder

Meeko Oishi
Meeko Oishi
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Meeko Oishi
Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia November 18, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Removing Barriers and Enabling Individuals: Ethics, Design, and Use of Assistive Technologies

Trevor Barnes
Trevor Barnes
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Trevor Barnes
Geography, University of British Columbia and 2009 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence October 28, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Two Men of War and Their Big Idea: Walter Christaller, Edward Ullman, and Central Place Theory

Sander Gilman
Sander Gilman, October 24, 2009
Workshops & Colloquia

Connecting Academic Research to Aboriginal Health

Sander Gilman
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Sander Gilman
Emory University and Cecil and Ida Green Visiting Professor October 24, 2009
Workshops & Colloquia

Connecting Academic Research to Aboriginal Health

Sander Gilman
Sander Gilman, October 23, 2009
Workshops & Colloquia

Ethnicity and Diabetes: The Jews as a 'Diabetic People'

Sander Gilman
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Sander Gilman
Emory University and Cecil and Ida Green Visiting Professor October 23, 2009
Workshops & Colloquia

Ethnicity and Diabetes: The Jews as a 'Diabetic People'

Danielle van Jaarsveld & Daniyal Zuberi
Danielle van Jaarsveld & Daniyal Zuberi, October 14, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Globalization and the Service Workplace

Danielle van Jaarsveld & Daniyal Zuberi
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Danielle van Jaarsveld & Daniyal Zuberi
Sauder School of Business and Sociology, University of British Columbia October 14, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Globalization and the Service Workplace

Alain Berthoz
Alain Berthoz, September 30, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

The Brain and Decisions: Emotion and Reason

Alain Berthoz
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Alain Berthoz
College de France and 2009 Peter Wall Distinguished Visiting Professor September 30, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

The Brain and Decisions: Emotion and Reason

Dinesh Pai
Dinesh Pai, September 16, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Eyes and Hands and Brains! Oh, My! The Biomechanical Modelling of the Eye and Hand

Dinesh Pai
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Dinesh Pai
Computer Science, University of British Columbia September 16, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Eyes and Hands and Brains! Oh, My! The Biomechanical Modelling of the Eye and Hand

Michael Doebeli
Michael Doebeli, May 27, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Evolution of Diversity

Michael Doebeli
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Michael Doebeli
Mathematics and Zoology, University of British Columbia and 2009 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence May 27, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Evolution of Diversity

David Fraser
David Fraser, May 13, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Conservation and Animal Welfare Science

David Fraser
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David Fraser
Land & Food Systems and Centre for Applied Ethics, University of British Columbia May 13, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Conservation and Animal Welfare Science

Martin Barlow
Martin Barlow, April 29, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Random Walks and Random Structure

Martin Barlow
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Martin Barlow
Mathematics, University of British Columbia and 2009 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence April 29, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Random Walks and Random Structure

Thomas Hutton
Thomas Hutton
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Thomas Hutton
Community & Regional Planning and Centre for Human Settlements, University of British Columbia April 15, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

The New Economy of the Inner City: Restructuring, Regeneration and Dislocation in the Metropolis

Harvey Richer
Harvey Richer, March 25, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Watcher of the Sky: An Observational Astronomer's View of the Universe

Harvey Richer
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Harvey Richer
Physics & Astronomy, University of British Columbia and 2009 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence March 25, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Watcher of the Sky: An Observational Astronomer's View of the Universe

Susanna Braund
Susanna Braund, March 11, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Translation and Authority

Susanna Braund
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Susanna Braund
Classical, Near Eastern, & Religious Studies, University of British Columbia March 11, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Translation and Authority

Leah Edelstein-Keshet
Leah Edelstein-Keshet, February 25, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

A Mathematician's Adventures in Cell Biology

Leah Edelstein-Keshet
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Leah Edelstein-Keshet
Mathematics, University of British Columbia and 2009 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence February 25, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

A Mathematician's Adventures in Cell Biology

Robert Brain
Robert Brain, February 11, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Varieties of Empathy in Science, Art and Culture

Robert Brain
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Robert Brain
History, University of British Columbia February 11, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Varieties of Empathy in Science, Art and Culture

Stephen Sheppard
Stephen Sheppard, January 28, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Changing Our High-Carbon Aesthetic: Shifting Attitudes on Climate Change

Stephen Sheppard
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Stephen Sheppard
Forest Resources Management and Landscape Architecture, University of British Columbia and 2009 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence January 28, 2009
Faculty Associates Forum

Changing Our High-Carbon Aesthetic: Shifting Attitudes on Climate Change

Sneja Gunew
Sneja Gunew, November 26, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

"I'm My Own Muse": Mediating the Personal in Contemporary Women's Art

Sneja Gunew
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Sneja Gunew
English and Women's Studies, University of British Columbia November 26, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

"I'm My Own Muse": Mediating the Personal in Contemporary Women's Art

Holger Hoos
Holger Hoos
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Holger Hoos
Computer Science, University of British Columbia November 12, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

Taming the Complexity Monster - On Computational Complexity and Ways of Dealing With It

Philip Austin
Philip Austin, September 24, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

The Art and Science of Climate Modeling

Philip Austin
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Philip Austin
Earth & Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia September 24, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

The Art and Science of Climate Modeling

Brett Gladman
Brett Gladman
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Brett Gladman
Physics & Astronomy, University of British Columbia September 10, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

Swapping Rocks: Natural Interplanetary Material Exchange and Implications for Planetary Protection

Immanuel Wallerstein
Immanuel Wallerstein, June 25, 2008
2008 Wall Summer Institute for Research

The Return of the Peasant: Possible? Desirable?

Immanuel Wallerstein
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Immanuel Wallerstein
Senior Research Scholar, Yale University, and Peter Wall Summer Institute Fellow, introduced by Arif Dirlik, Professor Emeritus, History, Duke University, and Chair Professor of Chinese Studies, Chine June 25, 2008
2008 Wall Summer Institute for Research

The Return of the Peasant: Possible? Desirable?

Jomo Kwame Sundaram
Jomo Kwame Sundaram, June 23, 2008
2008 Wall Summer Institute for Research

Washington Rediscovers Agriculture: The Political Economy of the Agrarian Turn

Jomo Kwame Sundaram
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Jomo Kwame Sundaram
Assistant Secretary General for Economic Development, United Nations, and Peter Wall Summer Institute Fellow June 23, 2008
2008 Wall Summer Institute for Research

Washington Rediscovers Agriculture: The Political Economy of the Agrarian Turn

Ronald Rensink
Ronald Rensink, May 28, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

Visual Analytics

Ronald Rensink
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Ronald Rensink
Psychology and Computer Science, University of British Columbia May 28, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

Visual Analytics

Brett Finlay
Brett Finlay, May 14, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

The Role of the Microbiota in Infectious Enteric Diseases

Brett Finlay
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Brett Finlay
Michael Smith Laboratories, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, and Microbiology & Immunology, University of British Columbia, and Peter Wall Distinguished Professor May 14, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

The Role of the Microbiota in Infectious Enteric Diseases

Alain Berthoz
Alain Berthoz, May 12, 2008
Special Associates Event

Brain, Space, and Movement

Alain Berthoz
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Alain Berthoz
College de France and Peter Wall Major Thematic Grant Distinguished Speaker May 12, 2008
Special Associates Event

Brain, Space, and Movement

William Benjamin
William Benjamin, April 23, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

Reproducing Music in Silence

William Benjamin
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William Benjamin
Music, University of British Columbia and 2008 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence April 23, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

Reproducing Music in Silence

Margery Fee
Margery Fee
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Margery Fee
English, University of British Columbia and 2008 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence March 26, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

What Can the Humanities Offer Science in Understanding Genetics and Social "Race"?

Tony Pitcher
Tony Pitcher, January 30, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

The Sea Ahead: Learning from the Past

Tony Pitcher
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Tony Pitcher
Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia and 2008 Peter Wall Distinguished Scholar in Residence January 30, 2008
Faculty Associates Forum

The Sea Ahead: Learning from the Past

, November 30, 1999
, November 30, 1999