Amanda D. Rodewald

Director of Conservation Science, Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Dept. of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Amanda Rodewald’s research program seeks to understand the behavioral and demographic mechanisms guiding population, community, and landscape-scale responses of birds to land use change and human activity in the eastern US and Latin America. She tightly integrates her research and outreach efforts to inform policy and management, and as such, regularly interacts with government agencies, conservation organizations, and private landowners. Among her national leadership activities she serves on the Science Advisory Board of US EPA.

Primary Recipient Awards

International Visiting Research Scholars, Amanda D. Rodewald, 2016

Amanda D. Rodewald
Peter Arcese

Co-principal Investigator Awards

International Research Roundtables, Peter Arcese, 2018

Peter Arcese

Promise and Peril: Design and Application of Conservation Finance Models to Biodiversity Conservation, Human Well-being and Sustainability

This roundtable will explore current initiatives and strategies needed to successfully scale-up conservation finance. A comprehensive understanding of barriers and benefits to private sector conservation finance requires engaging researchers from multiple disciplines, jurisdictions and perspectives.  Despite much evidence that private investment has the potential to transform biodiversity conservation and support sustainable livelihoods, many aspects of this emerging field remain poorly understood. This roundtable will engage thought-leaders in ecology, finance, policy, law, and social sciences to identify knowledge gaps, overcome existing hurdles and potential pitfalls. For example, it remains unclear how the outcomes of conservation projects should be articulated; i.e., at what point is re-claimed land 'restored'? A lack of a common framework for monitoring and evaluating such projects points out a critical need to ensure accountability and transparency. It is also unclear at what scale projects must be implemented to deliver sustainable environmental, social and financial outcomes. Likewise, how can accountability frameworks assure investors that projects avoid negative outcomes or externalities sometimes associated with protectionist approaches to land conservation, such as by creating parks that dispossess Indigenous people of land or natural capital. Strategies to minimize costs and overcome hurdles linked to transaction size, market volatility, and risk mitigation are also needed to scale up conservation investment.

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Feb 162017
International Visiting Research Scholar public talk
Accelerating rates of land conversion for agriculture, development, and resource extraction have challenged us to identify creative ways to sustain biodiversity, protect ecosystem...