Annette Henry

Wall Scholar

Title

Professor

Department/School

Department of Language and Literacy Education

Faculty

Arts

University

UBC

Geographic Location

Canada
Annette Henry

Annette henry holds the David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia. She is a Professor and former department head in the Department of Language and Literacy Education and is cross-appointed to the Institute for Race, Gender, Sexuality and Social Justice. Her scholarship examines race, class, language, gender and culture in socio-cultural contexts of teaching and learning in classrooms and especially in the lives of Black students and Black women teachers’ practice in Canada, the U.S. and the Caribbean. She writes about feminisms and conceptual and methodological research especially in culture-specific educational contexts. Prof. Henry has written extensively about equity in the academy, diverse feminisms and conceptual and methodological research. She is the recipient of several awards, including the Canadian Association of University Teachers Equity Award, and the Outstanding Contributions to Gender Award from the American Educational Research Association. Prof. Henry is currently working on a SSHRC-funded study, “This is the puzzle I’ve been trying to solve: A longitudinal study of the challenges and experiences of Blacks in Vancouver.”

Primary Recipient Awards

Annette Henry – Wall Scholars – 2021

As a Wall Scholar, Prof. Henry will probe the 2021-2022 theme of “complex systems” to examine race as a dynamic, adaptive complex system in the lives of Black women in Vancouver. Using Black feminist and diasporic theories, she will examine a subset of participants from her longitudinal oral history study. Envisioning race as a participant in the study, and the ways in which it has interacted with, and adapted to the conditions and circumstances of white supremacy in British Columbian society and participants’ lives, Annette hopes to explicate the ways that race performs and is embedded in the cultural and structural matrices.