Sheila Teves

Assistant Professor
PhD, University of Washington
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Prof. Sheila Teves integrates molecular biology, genomics, and imaging approaches to study embryonic stem cell biology and transcription regulation. She has identified how changes in transcription factor dynamics during distinct cell cycle stages affect transcriptional memory in mouse embryonic stem cells. Her previous training includes a postdoctoral fellowship in Robert Tjian's laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, and graduate training at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center with Dr. Steven Henikoff. Prof. Teves was recently named a Scholar for the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research, and has received several academic awards including the Jane Coffin Childs Postdoctoral Fellowship and the Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award.

Primary Recipient Awards

Wall Scholars, Sheila Teves, 2020

Sheila Teves
Wall Scholars

As a Wall Scholar, Prof. Teves will explore and generate new computational models that integrate genomics data with imaging analysis. Her work on transcription regulation to understand cell identity and function using embryonic stem cells relies on two very different technologies. Genomics analysis enable us to query processes at a global and genome-wide scale, but the information is necessarily static. That is, genomics provides a snap-shot of what is happening inside the cells at a given time. To complement these large-scale but static data, we use live-cell imaging analyses that allow us to examine individual proteins and genes at real-time resolution. Imaging analyses therefore is a low-throughput system that provides rich information on the dynamics of processes within cells. Her goals as a Wall scholar will be to explore new ways of integrating these distinct data and generate new computational models for understanding the intricate relationship between cell identity and transcription regulation.

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